Sweet Links ParTEA (February 2019)

We had a great month at STS! Rachel’s post, PhDogs and their Graduate Students (Part 1), was an absolute hit and we look forward to continuing this series and exploring other PhD Pets! Anyone can contribute to future posts with this form. We expressed our love for Friend Love and shared several tips for supporting your platonic relationships. Meridith shared her #NEONdata: A Recap experiences and information on how you can sign up for the next series of workshops! This month’s shared reads are best paired with optimistic thoughts of an early spring thanks to PA hero, Punxsutawney Phil. Let’s raise a glass for Phil and springtime!

This article provides great guidance on how to deal with and mitigate representation burnout that comes from being the first, and often the only, person of a particular identity in a new space. This is also a necessary read to folks who want to support people dealing with this type of burnout.

This interview with Robert Bullard is a important reminder of the uneven burdens of pollutions in different communities.

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#NEONdata: A Recap

As Abstract Season is underway (I have so many conferences I’m considering this year!) I thought it’d be a smart idea to finish up recapping some of my 2018 experiences. As part of my flurry of travel last semester I spent November 8 – 9 attending the Explore Neon Workshop at NEON’s headquarters in Boulder, Colorado. Looking back, I’m still shocked that so much information and guidance was conveyed in just two days! Myself and several other graduate students traveled to NEON, learned how to access and work with NEON data, and interacted with NEON science staff. I really enjoyed working with data alongside a group of ecologists/botanists/biologists/etc (no shade, statisticians, but ecologists will nerd out with me about nature AND data).

What is NEON?

The National Science Foundation’s National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a continental-scale ecological observation facility that collects and provides open data from field sites across the US. This project has been in the development and planning stages for several years and is now shifting into the beginning of its 30+ years of monitoring producing consistent, comparable, high-quality data. The ultimate goal is to collect data that can characterize and quantify how ecosystems across the 20 ecoclimatic domains  are changing.

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