Managing Your Motivation

Staying motivated in the unstructured work environment of academia can be difficult.  For me, it has always been easy to stay on task during the field season because the summer ticks away regardless of how much I get done.  I have to be organized and get in while the plants are growing and the tides are favorable. As summer gives way to fall, I have often gone through productivity slumps.  This was especially true after I was done with my coursework and, more recently, when I was struggling with some mental health issues. In spite of these challenges, I have been at this graduate school game for (*gulp*) nine years now, and I’ve learned a thing or two about how to bring structure to my days and set myself up for maximum productivity.  In other lucky news, I have tons of smart friends who kindly offered up some of their best advice on a Facebook thread I started. Thanks Tanya, Jeff, Christy, Brendan C, Danielle, Haley, Kevin, Sarah, Brendan H, Anne, Vadim, Ashley, Chhaya, Jamie, Lyndsey, Eddie, Jessica, Caroline, Sacha, Becky, Bjorn, Carlos, Aviva, and Colin!

Here are my top tips for staying focused and productive!

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That time I told the bartender I didn’t want popcorn and he told me I needed popcorn…and he was correct.

Continue reading “Managing Your Motivation”

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My #StatStud Starter Satchel Set-Up

The format for today’s blog post has been graciously borrowed from the Uses This website. This website hosts a collection of nerdy interviews asking people from all walks of life what they use to get the job done. I first stumbled upon this type of blog post on Hilary Parker’s old blog (ummm…I don’t think there’s a part 2?). Finding this blog post as a fledgling statistics PhD student was highly informative. What DO we all use to get our research done? I’m pretty certain if you asked grad students in my department they’d give  (at least slightly) different answers every time. And that is most certainly true as you get into most specific focuses (i.e. genetics data, theoretical statistics, etc). The outline below is certainly not the only/best set up, but it’s what I’ve got going on.

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Who are you, and what do you do?

I am Meridith Bartley, one-half of Sweet Tea, Science, and I am an ecological statistician. Ecolostician? Staticologist? I studied biology and ecology for a bit (well….six and a half years!  I have a Master’s degree in Wildlife Science and a BS in Biology) and now I am in my 5th year as a PhD student in the Statistics Department at Penn State. I’ve written about my experiences, daily life, tips, and reasons for this change of field a few times on this blog. I’m currently working on two projects: one looking at modelling the feeding interactions of laboratory ants we have video monitored (so much data!) and another exploring how to identify when one might be extrapolating in a multivariate response model with a neat application to lake water quality data. I spend most of my time writing code and manuscripts and trying to understand what the heck it is I am coding and writing. Almost all of my work is done either on my computer OR on scrap pieces of paper, which hopefully end up copied over to my “lab” notebook. Continue reading “My #StatStud Starter Satchel Set-Up”

Catching Up with STS – Meridith Edition

HELLO FRIENDS! It has been a long, tough year since Rachel and I have posted here on Sweet Tea, Science. We’ve tried to keep up with people via Twitter (Mer’s, Rach’s, and the STS accounts) and Instagram (again we all have one!) but we started feeling that blogging itch once more, so we’re back. We wanted to start with updates on our academic and personal lives, because this blog is about the science journeys of two actual living people. We’ve had some highs and lows. Some heart-breaking tragedies and some magical love-filled unions.

Summer 2017

This time last year I was enjoying the perks of summer in Colorado while exploring the in’s and out’s of working in an industry setting. I’ve had many summer adventures/internships/travels, but any work I’ve done has been 100% within the realm of academia. However, via a connection made through my advisor at the big statistics conference (Joint Statistical Meeting or JSM), I landed an internship at an environmental consulting agency. The further along I get in my studies the more certain I am I’d like to explore career options outside of academia; so this was an amazing opportunity.  

I worked with Neptune & Co., a small but growing environmental consulting company focusing on environmental decision making though quality assurance, data science, and risk assessment. As an intern, I helped the other statisticians working on a project modelling the future (millions of years future!) risks and impacts of nuclear waste storage around the US. I loved being able to learn about an important issue from experts in various fields while applying what I’ve been learning over the past few years in my PhD studies.

We focused on the biotic impact portion of the models and worked to use what precious few data are available to create some distributions for variable such as: plant root shape,root depth, burrow depths, etc. All of these factors can potentially bring up buried contaminants if the burrows or roots venture too deep. It’s important to represent these as distributions (e.g. a Normal distribution LINK) rather than a point estimate (e.g. a mean or median) because it allows for more representation of uncertainty in the model.

Also we did lots of hiking and took adorable photos!IMG_7278.jpg Continue reading “Catching Up with STS – Meridith Edition”