#ENVR2018: A Recap

It’s been a bit now, but last month from October 11 – 13, I traveled to Asheville, NC with the Hanks Lab and several other PSU statistics students to attend the 2018 ENVR Statistics for the Environment: Research, Practice and Policy Workshop. This densely packed workshop (really it was both workshop and conference…workonference? confshop?) offered a day of workshops, two days of 30 minute invited talks, and a poster session. I like that the American Statistical Association (ASA) Section on Environmental Statistics (ENVR) is a relatively small group of researchers, which allows for students to quickly meet people (future colleagues!) in this field and learn about what sort of research is happening right now.

What is ENVR?

Unless you are a statistician who does environmental/ecological related research you probably haven’t heard of this workshop. I’ve been doing this sort of work for 4 years now and it’s the first time I had really heard about it too! (Two years ago I was still taking classes and working on research so I probably didn’t have time to attend.) The Statistics for the Environment: Research, Practice and Policy is a biennial workshop of the section on Statistics and the Environment (ENVR) of the American Statistical Association. The overarching goal of the workshop is to bring together environmental statisticians working in academia, government research labs, and industry to present and discuss research ideas and methods to address important environmental and ecological problems. Funding for students, postdocs, and junior researchers within 2 years of terminal degree (travel costs + stipend) was available and easy to apply for thanks to ENVR, NSF, the North Carolina chapter of ASA, and Dr. Andrew Finley.

Continue reading “#ENVR2018: A Recap”
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Sweet Link ParTEA (August 2018)

We hope everyone has had a great August. As always, this month has gone by too fast. It’s already time again for our collection of awesome links and videos that we found enjoyable and/or important this month. Let us know if we missed any super cool posts!

“She drew their attention as a wolf that had a lot of moxie and was very adventurous.” Check out this NatGeo article about Nate Blakeslee’s new book, American Wolf, who’s central character was once “the most famous wolf in the world”.

This in-depth interview with Francis Weller, author of The Wild Edge of Sorrow: Rituals of Renewal and the Sacred Work of Grief, is a must read when you have the time.

We are clearly fans of Priya Shukla‘s Forbes articles. Check out this one about the ocean’s itty bitties with an important link to carbon cycling.

Continue reading “Sweet Link ParTEA (August 2018)”

My #StatStud Starter Satchel Set-Up

The format for today’s blog post has been graciously borrowed from the Uses This website. This website hosts a collection of nerdy interviews asking people from all walks of life what they use to get the job done. I first stumbled upon this type of blog post on Hilary Parker’s old blog (ummm…I don’t think there’s a part 2?). Finding this blog post as a fledgling statistics PhD student was highly informative. What DO we all use to get our research done? I’m pretty certain if you asked grad students in my department they’d give  (at least slightly) different answers every time. And that is most certainly true as you get into most specific focuses (i.e. genetics data, theoretical statistics, etc). The outline below is certainly not the only/best set up, but it’s what I’ve got going on.

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Who are you, and what do you do?

I am Meridith Bartley, one-half of Sweet Tea, Science, and I am an ecological statistician. Ecolostician? Staticologist? I studied biology and ecology for a bit (well….six and a half years!  I have a Master’s degree in Wildlife Science and a BS in Biology) and now I am in my 5th year as a PhD student in the Statistics Department at Penn State. I’ve written about my experiences, daily life, tips, and reasons for this change of field a few times on this blog. I’m currently working on two projects: one looking at modelling the feeding interactions of laboratory ants we have video monitored (so much data!) and another exploring how to identify when one might be extrapolating in a multivariate response model with a neat application to lake water quality data. I spend most of my time writing code and manuscripts and trying to understand what the heck it is I am coding and writing. Almost all of my work is done either on my computer OR on scrap pieces of paper, which hopefully end up copied over to my “lab” notebook. Continue reading “My #StatStud Starter Satchel Set-Up”