Sweet Link ParTEA (September 2018)

Last week was a garbage fire, with the news and all.  As a result, I’m (Rachel) going to give myself a pass on this post being many days late.  We hope these links give you a good distraction and help you welcome in October and the changing seasons. 

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This is a fascinating article about methane entering the atmosphere from thawing permafrost.  They dive into an arctic lake!  “Overall, if Walter Anthony’s findings are correct, the total impact from thawing permafrost could be similar to adding a couple of large fossil-fuel-emitting economies – say, two more Germanys – to the planet. “

If you want to up your #SciComm game check out this huge, free resource.

This is a very thoughtful piece about how teaching students the common underlying point of statistical tests might help them learn more, as opposed to parading as many tests as possible out over the course of the term.

Want to check out a fascinating and strangely beautiful #DataViz of how random the success of an individual published work can be?  Click right here.  I found this weirdly mesmerizing.   

The Atlantic takes a stark look at what was lost in the burning of the National Museum in Rio de Janeiro at the beginning of the month.  “Many of these presumably lost specimens were holotypes—the first, best, and most important examples of their kind.”  We both thought this fire was significant and each added an article about it.  This one does a really nice job of putting into context the importance of museum specimens to ongoing research efforts.

Continue reading “Sweet Link ParTEA (September 2018)”

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Photo Post: Last PhD Field Season

Welp, that title is actually a bit of a misnomer.  I really have about 4 more days of field work that I need to knock out over the next week or so.  DETAILS.  I know I wrote a lot recently about how stressful the summer can be for me.  It’s my busiest time of the year, field work is exhausting, and I probably don’t get enough alone time to really recharge (#introvertprobs).  But, more than any of those less positive things, I really love how much time I get to spend outside each field season.  I know I really like it, because I take about a zillion obnoxious iPhone pictures in the marsh each summer.

For your enjoyment, here is the view of my summer, from my smart phone.

Honest Tea gave me this gem on a day when I really needed it.img_7866 Continue reading “Photo Post: Last PhD Field Season”

The Science Grind

Editor’s Note:  Today, we are thrilled to bring you a guest post by my very own sister, Sara Wigginton!  We look super similar, we also both study invasive plants, and her current lab studies an invasive wetland plant.  I know, it’s weird.  Regardless, she is a smart, funny ecologist, and Meridith and I are excited to share her words with you.

One of my favorite things about blogging is the ability to share the reality of my day to day life with you all.  Sara’s piece really gets to the heart of what the day-to-day as an ecologist can feel like.  Tell us your stories of the Science Grind in the comments section!

“Spectacular achievement is always preceded by unspectacular preparation”- Robert H. Schuller (A televangelist who said an insightful thing at least once.)

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Collecting invasive Phragmites in China

 

Some days I might be knee deep in a marsh, breathing in deeply the weird smell I’ve come to love, thanking my favorite deity (Mother Nature) that I don’t have a desk job.

 

Other days, I might be extracting DNA to sequence and haplotype, thinking it is so cool that I know how to do something called “haplotyping.” Continue reading “The Science Grind”