#NEONdata: A Recap

As Abstract Season is underway (I have so many conferences I’m considering this year!) I thought it’d be a smart idea to finish up recapping some of my 2018 experiences. As part of my flurry of travel last semester I spent November 8 – 9 attending the Explore Neon Workshop at NEON’s headquarters in Boulder, Colorado. Looking back, I’m still shocked that so much information and guidance was conveyed in just two days! Myself and several other graduate students traveled to NEON, learned how to access and work with NEON data, and interacted with NEON science staff. I really enjoyed working with data alongside a group of ecologists/botanists/biologists/etc (no shade, statisticians, but ecologists will nerd out with me about nature AND data).

What is NEON?

The National Science Foundation’s National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a continental-scale ecological observation facility that collects and provides open data from field sites across the US. This project has been in the development and planning stages for several years and is now shifting into the beginning of its 30+ years of monitoring producing consistent, comparable, high-quality data. The ultimate goal is to collect data that can characterize and quantify how ecosystems across the 20 ecoclimatic domains  are changing.

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Friend Love

Here at Sweet Tea, Science we are big believers in the importance of platonic relationships to one’s general quality of life. Our culture tends to give supremacy to romantic partnerships, which is a bummer as it undercuts the intimacy and importance of friendship. We think meaningful friendships are extra important during the graduate school journey. It’s a long haul, and it’s important to have a network of support you can rely on to pep you up, cheer you on, and help you problem solve.

5 quick ways to show support to your pals

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PhDogs and their Graduate Students (Part 1)

Buckle up for some #wholesomeAF content. I’m so excited to share the first installment of our series on how dogs can enrich one’s experience in graduate school. Really, none of us deserve how good dogs are, but we try to be worthy of their affection. Read on for three stories of doggos who deserve honorary degrees.

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